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Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

3 edition of Non-accidental injury to children found in the catalog.

Non-accidental injury to children

Non-accidental injury to children

proceedings of a conference held at [and organised by] the Department of Health and Social Security on 19 June 1974.

  • 325 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by H.M.S.O. in London .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Great Britain
    • Subjects:
    • Child abuse -- Great Britain -- Congresses.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 55-62.

      ContributionsGreat Britain. Dept. of Health and Social Security.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHV751.A6 N66 1975
      The Physical Object
      Pagination[3], 74 p. ;
      Number of Pages74
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4951448M
      ISBN 100113206321
      LC Control Number76379634

      The Child and the Law: The Roles and Responsibilities of the Radiographer(3). Sudden Unexplained Death in Infancy(5). Standards for Radiological Investigations of Suspected Non-accidental Injury(2). Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations (IR(ME)R) (7). In addition, all staff must follow their own local rules written under IR(ME)R. Non-accidental injury to children (NAI) refers to their ill-treatment by parents or guardians, and embraces physical or mental neglect or actual physical injury. NAI has now replaced the term ‘Battered Baby Syndrome’ because children older than babies are involved and besides being battered they may be shaken, burned or deliberately Author: A. H. Davies.

      Recognition and diagnosis of child abuse and neglect creates an important foundation for the protection of children. Physicians and other healthcare providers have a fundamental role in this process, and need to be confident that they can identify correctly the signs and symptoms that provide clues to non-accidental injuries resulting from child maltreatment. Non‐accidental injury in children rarely seems to be out of the spotlight. The public eye intermittently falls upon tragic cases and disputed medical evidence, the healthcare professions engage in a never‐ending round of child protection awareness raising and induction training, Author: David Watkins.

      Bruising in children poses a diagnostic challenge to health care providers. Bruising can be caused by an underlying medical condition, accidental injury, or physical abuse. It is estimated that over 50% of children older than 1 year will have bruising from minor accidental injury.[] However, bruising is also the most common injury in children who have been physically abused.   In October , NICE published a guideline on child abuse and neglect. Recommendations relevant to both health and social care practitioners appear in this guideline and the child abuse and neglect guideline. Clinical features (including physical injuries.


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Non-accidental injury to children Download PDF EPUB FB2

Tom Sanders is a medical sociologist with research and teaching interests in the sociology of the professions and non-accidental injury in young children. He has published on a broad range of topics in the areas of medical sociology and health services by: 2.

This book provides an excellent insight into current thinking, research, and courtroom practice with regard to non-accidental head injury in young children. The research is linked to theory throughout the book and this provides a rounded perspective with regard to the subject matter.

The methodology and raw results of the research are appended.'- s academic research volume explores non-accidental head injury in babies and young children, covering medical, social, and legal aspects of this phenomenon, as well as the responsibilities of professionals, child protection agencies and the media in this ‐“Any non-accidental physical injury to the child" •Striking, kicking, burning, or biting the child •Any action that results in a physical impairment of the.

Non-accidental injury in children in the time of COVID pandemic. By Emily Baird Royal Hospital for Sick Children Edinburgh. Correspondence to: [email protected] Published 08 April Non- accidental injury (NAI) is often considered to be a silent pandemic.

Even in the best of times, sadly abuse goes unnoticed and children come to harm. Fractures are the second most common manifestation of child abuse after soft tissue injuries. 85% of fractures from non-accidental injury occur in children under the age of 3 and 69% occur in infants under the age of 1.

Although there are fracture patterns suggestive of abuse, there are no patterns that are pathognomonic for non-accidental Size: KB. Non-Accidental Injury to Children: A Possible Treatment Program - Volume 2 Issue 4 - Dennis Ford, Carol Dawson If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account.

Find out Author: Dennis Ford, Carol Dawson. Bruising is the most common injury to a child who has been physically abused. The 'Bruises on children' leaflet covers: how to differentiate accidental from non-accidental bruises. common assumptions about bruising in children cannot be substantiated.

when to be concerned that there's the possibility of child abuse or neglect. nd therefore pregnancy in such a child means the child has been maltreated" \(pages 8 and 55\) should be accompanied by a footnote which states the following:\r"Under the sexual Offences Actany sexual intercourse with a girl\ryounger than 13 years \ is unlawful and will be charged as rape.

Book Description. Recognition and diagnosis of child abuse and neglect creates an important foundation for the protection of children. Physicians and other healthcare providers have a fundamental role in this process, and need to be confident that they can identify correctly the signs and symptoms that provide clues to non-accidental injuries resulting from child maltreatment.

Non-accidental trauma (NAT) is a leading cause of childhood traumatic injury and death in the United States. It is estimated that 1, children died from maltreatment in the United States in and abusive head trauma (AHT) accounted for 80% of these by: Shop for children's books by age, series, author, subject and format.

Find bestsellers, new releases, award winners and our recommended books for kids at   Recognition and diagnosis of child abuse and neglect creates an important foundation for the protection of children.

Physicians and other healthcare providers have a fundamental role in this process, and need to be confident that they can identify correctly the signs and symptoms that provide clues to non-accidental injuries resulting from child maAuthor: Vincent J Palusci, Dena Nazer, Patricia O Brennan.

Buy Non-Accidental Head Injury in Young Children: Medical, Legal and Social Responses 1 by Cathy Cobley and Tom Sanders (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Cathy Cobley and Tom Sanders. Children 1 to 4 years of age had the highest rates of nonfatal falls and poisoning. Injury rates related to motor vehicles was highest in children 15 to 19 years of age. Page last reviewed: February 6,PM. Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.

Recent injury in normal children and children with suspected non accidental injury'. BMJ – del Ciampo LA, Ricco RG, De Almeida CA, et al () 'Incidence of childhood accidents determined in a study based on home surveys'. Non-accidental burns in children.

the Unit had concerns that the family's emotional or social situation was a significant factor in the child's injury, or made further injury more likely, and discussed the family's situation with the Department, but formal intervention was not undertaken by the Department.

it appears that many children Cited by: Suspected physical abuse (previously termed non-accidental injury, NAI) in infants and young children represent both ethical and legal challenges to treating physicians.

Radiologists may be the first clinical staff to suspect non-accidental injuries when confronted with a particular injury pattern. HAEMORRHAGIC RETINOPATHY OF SHAKING INJURY: CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS Kristina May, M Andrew Parsons and Robert Doran 6.

ULTRASOUND AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF NON-ACCIDENTAL HEAD INJURY Tim Jaspan 7. INITIAL AND SEQUENTIAL MRI IN NON-ACCIDENTAL HEAD INJURY Maeve McPhillips 8. SKELETAL INJURIES. Skeletal injuries are the most common findings noted on imaging studies in cases of child abuse.

In infants (injuries, they are rarely by: 3. Get this from a library! Non-accidental injury to children: proceedings of a conference held at [and organised by] the Department of Health and Social Security on 19 June [Great Britain.

Department of Health and Social Security.;].This chapter provides a guide to the features of childhood injury that should raise suspicion of physical abuse and the assessment and investigations that should be performed to determine the likelihood of physical abuse.In child abuse (non-accidental injury), ulceration of the upper labial fraenum may follow a traumatic fraenal tear.

Bruised and swollen lips, and even subluxed teeth or fractured mandible, can be other features of child abuse.